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Clydesdales drafted for promo

Katie Dahl, two, and her mum Sandra took a closer look at the Carlton United Brewers Clydesdale team in Grafton on Saturday.
Katie Dahl, two, and her mum Sandra took a closer look at the Carlton United Brewers Clydesdale team in Grafton on Saturday.

SOME very large and very special creatures made their way to Grafton and Yamba over the weekend as part of a living link to the past.

Before trucks became the norm, Carlton United Breweries - like most beer companies - used Clydesdales to deliver their stock.

These days, Carlton still use their gentle giants, but only for promotional purposes.

The Clydesdale team visited Grafton on Saturday then travelled to Yamba yesterday.

Glen Pate, Carlton United Brewery's Clydesdale team manager, said CUB had never been without their famous Clydesdales.

"The iconic Clydesdale image continues to be an integral part of the trademark," Mr Pate aid.

"The team provide a living link to CUB's heritage and bring to life the brand essence and back story of delivering draught beer.

"The Carlton Clydesdales take part in over 60 events each year, comprising of trade customer visits, sponsored events and community activity.

"They remain a reminder of the pride, spirit and tradition of Carlton and United Breweries."

The horses are transported around the country using a specially-modified truck.

Mr Pate said Clydesdales were pulling wagons laden with wooden barrels of freshly brewed Carlton ales from as early as 1864 and were replaced by motorised trucks just after the Second World War.

"Today's teams have it much easier than their predecessors," he said.

 

Horsey facts

It takes 45cm of steel to make each Clydesdale shoe.

The horses are shod every five to six weeks.

The average weight of a team horse is 850kg.

The team travels about 5-6 kms per hour.

Clydesdales in Australia date back to early European settlement.

Topics:  carlton united breweries, clydesdales, grafton, horses




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