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Crackdown on child care rorts

THE Turnbull Government has introduced measures to clamp down on unscru- pulous child care providers, a move expected to save taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

Among the loopholes to be targeted is 'child swapping', a rort that allowed some family day care providers to receive child care payment for their own children, while they were being paid to look after other people's children.

Minister for Education and Training Simon Birmingham yesterday released statistics showing in the 10 weeks since closing the loophole, the government had saved about $7.7 million a week.

Department of Education and Training date reveals the new measures have already stopped $283 million from going to dishonest family day carers, amounting to nearly $700 million a year in savings.

"We want to ensure every taxpayer dollar spent on child care supports families to balance their work obligations or children to access early learning, rather than being rorted by those more interested in lining their own pockets," Mr Birmingham said.

"Perpetrators of fraud are on notice: you will be caught."

Topics:  child care, government




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