News

Drinkers desert pubs

Judy Hardy from Richmond Homebrewing Supplies, a home brewing store in Lismore, in front of some of the styles of home brew they sell.
Judy Hardy from Richmond Homebrewing Supplies, a home brewing store in Lismore, in front of some of the styles of home brew they sell. Patrick Gorbunovs

AUSSIES are turning away from their local watering holes in favour of a quiet, and sometimes not-so-quiet drink at home, according to a new study.

The new research by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) found 74% of Australians drink alcohol at home or at a friend's house.

The figures are in stark contrast to previous generations when 70% of drinking was conducted in a pub or club.

While the latest figures may be bad news for pubs and clubs, Judy Hardy from Richmond Homebrewing Supplies said the move was good news for them.

Mrs Hardy said she suspected that economic factors were the biggest force driving people away from pubs.

"Since I bought the shop in 2009 every time interest rates go up I get an influx of people wanting starter kits."

"You can make two-and-a-half cartons of beer for $20, if going out was that cheap, people wouldn't bother (making their own)."

FARE's chief executive, Michael Thorn, said the figure reflected societal changes to drinking.

"It's been going on for 40 years," Mr Thorn said. "A lot of social and economic factors shape the way people consume alcohol."

Mr Thorn suggested the prevalence of cheap take-away alcohol, increasing cost of living, growing job uncertainty and tough drink-driving penalties were factors behind the move to home drinking.

The research also found that changes in drinking behaviour were resulting in a large number of harms in the home with four million Australians negatively affected by the alcohol consumption of a household member, relative or friend.

"Drinking at home can contribute to the normalisation of drinking when done in front of children," Mr Thorn said. "This study aims to establish harms to others rather than just the drinker."

Station hotel regular Corey Smith said despite the increased cost of living he still preferred to drink at his local because of the camaraderie that it had.

"I come here to have a yarn," Mr Smith said. "There's more people at the pub."

Findings

74% of people mainly consume alcohol at home or at a friend's house; 24% of people mainly consume alcohol at a pub, club or restaurant; Gen Y (38%) is more likely than Gen X (20%) and Baby Boomers (19%) to consume alcohol at a pub, club or restaurant.

Topics:  drinking, pubs




Join the Community.

Get your local news, your way.

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

FAIR GO: A tale of two babies

Jeremy and Stacey Billett with their one-week-old baby Charlotte Jeanette Billett at their home in Ilarwill.

Country babies lose out to their city cousins

Tenderer announced for new Harwood bridge

APPROVED: Chris Gulaptis and Duncan Gay (right) congratulate approved tenderers for the Harwood bridge project, Acciona Ferrovial Joint Venture.

New Clarence River crossing to remove notorious traffic hotspot

$500 camera for plunge winner: help us decide

VOTE for the best Instagram #cvcplunge2016 photo.

Latest deals and offers

Grafton City SES Training

Grafton SES unit controller Adam Jarrett explains the process involved in being an...

British family bashed in Thailand

Family beaten and kicked unconscious by gang in Thailand.

Family beaten and kicked unconscious by gang in Thailand.

Ben Hunt wary of Sharks Halfback

Ben Hunt of the Broncos looks to pass during the round 23 NRL match between the Brisbane Broncos and the St George Illawarra Dragons at Suncorp Stadium.

Ben Hunt talks about Cronulla's Chad Townsend.

How a sacked real estate agent made $725k in four months

Agent is now under investigation by the industry watchdog

VIDEO: Art Deco fan pays $835,000 for Imperial Hotel

No Caption

Iconic "Impy" sold at a bargan price to bidder who loves Art Deco.

RBA warns of future apartment oversupply

Toowoomba: Crest Apartments and Burke & Wills, Ruthven Street ( view from Neil Street) Photo Bev Lacey / The Chronicle

RBA says oversupply of apartments poses risk to household finances