Australian soldiers on patrol in Afghanistan are under constant risk of attack from the Taliban.
Australian soldiers on patrol in Afghanistan are under constant risk of attack from the Taliban. Australian Department of Defence

Australian soldier wounded after Afghan soldier opens fire

AN Australian solider has been wounded after an Afghan National Security Force member opened fire on coalition soldiers just outside the country's capital Kabul.

The incident occurred on Saturday at a meeting at a facility where personnel from NATO's International Security Assistance Force help to train future Afghan army officers.

A New Zealand soldier was also hurt in the insider attack and both men received immediate treatment.

Reports say an argument broke out before the Afghan solider began shooting.

Australian forces responded to the threat yesterday morning and the New Zealand Defence Force says the Afghan army officer was shot and killed.

The injured Australian was treated for minor fragmentation wounds.

Acting Chief of the Australian Defence Force Air Marshal Mark Binskin said the quick actions of coalition soldiers helped prevent more serious injuries.

"From initial reporting, it would appear that our soldiers reacted promptly and professionally, potentially saving any other ISAF or Afghan personnel from sustaining wounds or worse," he said.

"It is impossible to completely remove the threat of insider attacks, but the actions of the ADF soldiers demonstrate that our training and force protection techniques are appropriate and prepared to respond, when incidents such as this occur."

The Australian soldier is expected to return to duty soon.



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