A pig forages at Parliament House Canberra, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Senators have called for an urgent review of Australia's quarantine laws to ensure Australia's pork industry is kept free of the devastating Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome.
A pig forages at Parliament House Canberra, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Senators have called for an urgent review of Australia's quarantine laws to ensure Australia's pork industry is kept free of the devastating Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome. AAP Image - Alan Porritt

Pork industry warns weak labelling laws are cheating us

AUSTRALIAN pork producers claim their industry is being undermined by weak labelling laws that make it easy for foreign pig meat to be portrayed as home-grown.

Australian Pork Limited chief executive Andrew Spencer told ABC Landline on Sunday fine print and vague language meant customers find it difficult to make decisions.

"Labelling makes it really confusing for our consumers to even identify Australian-grown bacon," he said.

"People do not understand when they are eating bacon there is a very large chance it has come from a pig grown on the other side of the world."

He said the industry is urging the Federal Government to make tougher laws that more clearly identify the country of origin.

Producers are attempting to stem the flood of cheap bacon imports by promoting APL's pink pork-mark label which guarantees a product is Australian.



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