Horton's Creek Bridge. The aftermath of recent bushfires impacting the Armidale Road. Photo: Clarence Valley Council
Horton's Creek Bridge. The aftermath of recent bushfires impacting the Armidale Road. Photo: Clarence Valley Council

‘A bridge is not something you can just build overnight’

CONTRACTORS are racking up a huge number of hours in a bid to reopen the Armidale Road - but the work is far from over.

Following an update noted at last week's council meeting, staff estimated there was 420km of roads affected by bushfire in the Clarence Valley with that figure not taking into account the most recent damage in the northeast of the LGA.

The worst-hit road was undoubtedly the Armidale road with at least two bridges destroyed and which Clarence Valley Council director of works and civil Troy Anderson described as "lifeless carnage".

"Even coming in three weeks afterwards it is still devastating," he said.

"Where we have bridges that have been damaged it is a priority to get designs and orders in place to try and get the road back to normal as quick as we can.

"A bridge is not something you can just build overnight."

 

 

The aftermath of recent bushfires impacting the Armidale Road. Photo: Clarence Valley Council
The aftermath of recent bushfires impacting the Armidale Road. Photo: Clarence Valley Council

 

 

The council has engaged six contractors to work in the area under council supervision but Mr Anderson acknowledged the scale of the effort has been taking a toll on those involved.

"We have staff that are weary and we are trying to look after them as much as we can," he said.

During a six-day period last week, staff working on the clean-up had logged over 1750 hours, felling more than 800 trees.

The message out of council was one of patience.

Mr Anderson said it was probably the biggest disaster clean-up in recent memory.

"There is massive amounts of work to be done.

"We have done a lot and we will get there, but this is going to keep us going for a long time," he said.

"Please be patient. We are doing everything in our power to get things done as quick as possible."



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