Barry De-Bomford and his wife Patricia De-Bomford at the Yamba Anzac Day march
Barry De-Bomford and his wife Patricia De-Bomford at the Yamba Anzac Day march Ebony Stansfield

Veterans share memories of war at Yamba Anzac

BARRY de Bomford, who served two tours in Vietnam in 67-68 and 70-71 and served for 30 years in the Australian army, attended the march in Yamba yesterday.

It was hard for him to decide the most memorable moment during his years of service.

"When we were in contacts with the enemy, the bad guys... and good guys, you know," he said.

"Maybe when we got blown up by the mines that was the biggest memory, my forward scout lost both of his legs, I was right behind him and got a bit of shrapnel but he got both legs."

"That is the most memorable one."

To him, Anzac Day gives reminds him of when they were young.

"How we used to be, how fit we used to be them days and friendship, good friendship and good mates, about all sticking together."

He said Australia was a free country, the most free country in the world.

"Within reason you can say what you want to say, freeness and free to do what you want provided it's legal," he said.

He is originally from Tasmania and moved to Yamba 22 years ago, with his wife Patricia De-Bomford.

BARRY De-Bomford served two tours in Vietnam in 67-68 and 70-71 and served for thirty years in the Australian army, attended the march in Yamba yesterday.

It was hard to decide the most memorable moment from serving.

"When we were in contacts with the enemy, the back guys...and good guys you know," he said.

"Maybe when we got blown up by the mines that was the biggest memory, my forward scout lost both of his legs, I was right behind him and got a bit of shrapnel but he got both legs."

"That's is the most memorable one."

To him Anzac Day gives reminds him of when they were young.

"How we used to be, how fit we used to be then days and friendship, good friendship and good mates, about all sticking together."

He said Australia is a free country, the most free country in the world.

"Within reason you can say what you want to say, freeness and free to do what you want provided it's legal," he said.

He is originally from Tasmania and moved to Yamba 22 years ago, with his wife Patricia De-Bomford.

 



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