BACK TRACKING: Former Grafton City Council town planner and Clarence River Jockey Club chairman, Bob Pavitt.
BACK TRACKING: Former Grafton City Council town planner and Clarence River Jockey Club chairman, Bob Pavitt.

Bob Pavitt calls quits

By DAVID BANCROFT

WHEN Bob Pavitt first came to Grafton City Council as a town planner in the 1980s, the biggest item on the agenda of the time was the development of Grafton Shoppingworld.

After spending 21 years as Grafton town planner, Mr Pavitt leaves what is now the Clarence Valley Council this month, and the biggest item on the agenda was the development of Grafton Shoppingworld.

After growing up on the Central Coast, Mr Pavitt moved to Sydney to spend eight years at the South Sydney Council.

He spent a total of three years at Newcastle and some time in the Tweed before coming to Grafton where he, his wife Cheryl, and daughters Kate and Sally settled.

Kate and Sally have now moved to Sydney for work, but Bob and Cheryl have no intention of leaving the Clarence.

Cheryl still works with the Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources.

Bob intends to get even more involved in his other great interest, horse racing.

"Yeah, I will spend a bit more time at the races," he said.

"And I hope to get to a few more of the country carnivals each year."

At 57 years of age, Mr Pavitt says he is in good health, but thought it was the appropriate time to leave.

The amalgamation of the councils provided part of the incentive, but Mr Pavitt said it was his decision alone to go.

"I thought it was the appropriate time to go to let some of the younger staff get in and do some of the hard work," he joked.

He will miss his workmates and the comraderie of working at the council, but there are a few things he will gladly leave behind.

"I certainly won't miss the dog complaints, the noise complaints, the neighbourhood disputes and the telephone ringing constantly," he said.

"I can do without those."



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