AN ARTFORM: Fay Bull, of Evans Head, and Fay Farnham, of Maclean, at the annual quilting bee in Maclean. Photo: ADAM HOURIGAN.
AN ARTFORM: Fay Bull, of Evans Head, and Fay Farnham, of Maclean, at the annual quilting bee in Maclean. Photo: ADAM HOURIGAN.

Busy little quilting bees



HOW much is a quilt worth to the person who made it?

Some might argue that the artistic flair and hours of labour invested into making something like a patchwork quilt or a wall-hanging would make the items priceless.

Then there are people, like those at Tuesday's quilting bee at the Uniting Church Hall in Maclean, who went with their wallets open ready to take something home.

But whether it was to admire the handiwork of the Maclean Patchwork and Quilters Association, or to pick up a thoughtful gift, the quilting bee had something for everyone.

According to the association's publicity officer, Pam Turner, people made a day of it, travelling from outside the Clarence Valley to meet in Maclean for the quilting bee.

The association's 45 members presented about 200 items, including knee rugs, table runners and, of course, quilts for display, while others were available to the public to purchase.

Now into its third year as part of the Biggest Morning Tea fundraising program to raise money for the NSW Cancer Council, the quilting bee has become almost a tradition for some visitors.

And while some people might think quilting and patchwork is old-fashioned, Mrs Turner believed the regularity with which new members were joining the association proved otherwise.

"I don't think it will ever become a lost artform because it's an expression of artistic creativity and can be whatever people want it to be," she said.



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