Cansdell calls for ID card and DNA collection


A NATIONAL identification card and collection of DNA samples from the entire population would help reduce the risk of terrorist attacks on Australia as well as helping unravel unsolved murders, State Member for Clarence Steve Cansdell said yesterday.

Mr Cansdell has thrown his support behind a national DNA database and ID card saying that 'personal liberty' should be pushed aside for the 'nation's safety'.

"People complain because they say that by bringing in an ID card or by storing DNA samples, that we are taking away their personal liberty," he said.

"My response is, what have you got to hide?

"I don't see a problem with any of it."

The concept of a national ID card was re-ignited by the Howard Government following the London bombings earlier this month.

The ID card, which could contain details about each individual and be stored on a centralised database, was flagged more than 20 years ago by the then Labor government, but was dumped with claims the card was an invasion of privacy.

Mr Cansdell said with mounting international hostilities, the idea should be revisited.

It would also help police in closing cold cases and speeding up current investigations into serious crimes, he said.

"If you had everyone's details, including DNA samples, it would go a long way in solving every murder or rape that has happened in the country," he said.

"Obviously the threat of terrorism and terrorist attacks have highlighted the issue again.

"With the science and technology of today collecting DNA samples is easy.

"It would also prove as a deterrent for criminals to commit crimes."

Mr Cansdell said he did not believe children should be subjected to DNA sample collection but added that 'serious crimes' were being commited by people as young as 12.

"I think 18 may be an age to start," he said.

Mr Cansdell said that the ID system should not be discounted without 'workshopping' ideas.

Local Partners