CHIPS ANYONE?: Ranger and special constable Errol Woods puts the word out that all dogs sold privately still have to be microch
CHIPS ANYONE?: Ranger and special constable Errol Woods puts the word out that all dogs sold privately still have to be microch

Chipping in with some sound advice

By JULIA ILES

MICRO-CHIPS for companion dogs and cats are mandatory, but many owners continue to defy laws.

Special Constable of Animal Control law enforcement, Errol Woods, finds pet owners are often ignorant of their responsibility.

The department does random checks of newspaper advertisements with dogs or cats for sale, he said.

Sellers are often caught out by not having the animals micro-chipped and registered.

Normally owners face a warning for their first offence then, if caught again, face fines of $110.

According to the NSW Government Companion Animals Act of 1998, all dogs and cats (with the exception of working dogs), need to be permanently identified with a microchip by 12 weeks of age.

Each year 80,000 cats and dogs are found injured, lost and stolen in NSW. Many are unable to be identified and are at risk of being destroyed.

The micro-chip is implanted through a syringe and is the size of a grain of rice. It's placed between the shoulder blades at the back of the neck where there is normally loose skin.

The whole process only takes around two-three minutes and will remain in the animal for life.

Apart from the micro-chip pets need to be registered, which involves paying a registration fee that ranges from $35 to $100 depending on whether the animal is desexed.

Banyabba resident Bev Pattenden does not agree with the laws as she feels it's difficult for renters, people who live in caravans or those who often change their address.

This is because for each move the owner has to re-register the address with the council.

She said the State Government policy was a 'whole lot of bureaucracy' and is concerned that the centralised database infringes on privacy issues.



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