Map showing proposed location to subdivide parts of the existing 10th and 11th holes at the Grafton District Golf Club will go.
Map showing proposed location to subdivide parts of the existing 10th and 11th holes at the Grafton District Golf Club will go.

Club aims at hole or two

By TOBY WALKER

PLANS to develop two new holes at the Grafton District Golf Club are now on public display.

The club's plan to construct two new par fours on land near the existing 16th tee has been put on display at the Bent Street clubhouse.

However, construction of the holes remains on hold as the club waits for Clarence Valley Council approval to rezone, subdivide and sell part of the existing 10th and 11th holes.

According to club general manager Tony Everingham, the expected income from the sale of 23 blocks of land adjoining the course would provide enough money to carry out important works to secure the financial future of the course.

The blocks, 15 of which were between 1200 and 1450 square metres and eight of which were between 1345 and 3099 square metres, were estimated to raise $1.6million in sales, as forecast at November 2003.

Mr Everingham said it was essential to reduce potential public liability costs that could arise from errant golf balls going onto the road and near homes adjoining the current 10th and 11th tees ? the proposed subdivision site.

He said the funds from land sales would also allow the club to begin constructing a pipeline that would pump effluent water from the Clarenza sewerage treatment plant to the course, effectively bringing drought-proofing.

Although there had initially been public opposition to the club's proposal from nearby homeowners when it was first put up in 2003, Mr Everingham said he believed it was the best thing for the club and the area.

LJ Hooker Grafton principal Matt Dougherty believes the club will probably stand to earn more than the projected $1.6million from land sales.

He believes the higher gains from sales will most likely be balanced out by higher costs to subdivide the land and build the effluent pipeline.

"I think it makes for a cracker of a subdivision. I think the blocks would be highly sought-after and it would certainly be a good income-generator for the golf club, he said.



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