Cold weather to blame for Valley rodent influx



AN increase in the number of mice and rats in the Clarence Valley over the past few weeks is nothing unusual, according to pest controllers.

Some residents have reported trapping up to 15 mice each night, but according to rodent eradicators, the increase in mouse and rat activity is probably just a factor of the onset of cooler weather.

Mick Quinn of Quinn's Pest Control said the pests were everywhere.

"But it's only due to a change in the weather," he said.

"They want to come inside where it's warm. They're also coming in looking for a bit more tucker."

Mr Quinn said baiting and trapping were the best methods to get rid of the rodents, but he preferred traps because it was easier to dispose of the carcasses.

"If you have a major problem you probably need to go through some baiting, but they will die in the roof cavity, the walls or under the fridge and you end up with a smell," he said.

He said a bottle of nill odour, which was available from supermarkets, would help get rid of the smell.

Gary McCormick of Puresafe Pest Control said the onset of cooler weather brought rats and mice into sheds and houses.

"Baiting is the best way to get rid of them," he said.

"Everywhere they go at night they urinate and defecate along the way. Where you find these tracks, that is where you put the baits."

But Mr McCormick warned that the blood thinning agent in baits could affect domestic animals.

"Cats will go for mice if they are still wriggling, but a vet can act if you get the animal in within a couple of hours," he said.



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