Court rules old tyres to be out of order for riverbank



Illegal riverbank works at Goodwood Island have cost an Ebor man $750 in fines, court charges and the cost of riverbank repairs.

The man had used 800 old car tyres to reclaim about 80 metres of the river foreshore.

The Department of Primary Industries (DPI) initiated an investigation under the Fisheries Management Act 1994 of the alleged works after receiving information from a member of the public.

The man claimed he was attempting to prevent bank erosion, but NSW DPI program manager (Aquatic Habitat Protection) Sarah Fairfull, said the use of car tyres and any other waste materials was an unacceptable method of bank stabilisation.

"Car tyres can pollute waters and damage aquatic habitats if the river bank stabilisation works fail and the tyres wash away," she said.

The maximum penalty for an offence of this nature is $110,000.

The Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources has now reminded landholders that they need to apply for government approval before undertaking any works within 40 metres of waterways.

A spokesman said it was committed to conserving fish habitats and said landholders need to seek advice and apply for the relevant approvals before undertaking any works within waterways.



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