MASTER PUPPETEERS: Members of the eRTH Visual and Physical street theatre company are excited about bringing their unique stree
MASTER PUPPETEERS: Members of the eRTH Visual and Physical street theatre company are excited about bringing their unique stree

Festival?s street theatre coup

By ADRIAN MILLER

amiller@dailyexaminer.com.au

YAMBA, prepare to be terrorised by dinosaurs, rhinos and giant, stilt-walking insects.

Crowds at Yamba's Surfing The Coldstream Festival will have to stay on their toes over the weekend of October 22-23 as the eRTH Visual and Physical street theatre company comes to town.

Famous for their giant puppets, huge inflatables, acrobatics and pyrotechnics, the performers have planned a visual feast for the festival, according to company director Scott Wright.

"It'll be spectacular to say the least," he said.

"We'll be bringing some pyrotechnics and we possibly might set fire to some of our puppets at the end of the parade.

"It'll be a big free for all ? it's kinda like going into a lolly shop and getting the best of eRTH."

eRTH will provide the festival highlight on Saturday night when they parade along Coldstream Street showing off their newly-made puppets and inflatables.

Mr Wright said the company would also perform shows throughout the weekend.

"On the days we'll be trying to get as many of our acts onto the street as possible without killing ourselves," he said.

"We're trying to bring up as many (props) as we can to make it as diverse and as spectacular as possible."

Mr Wright said the parade will feature students from Maclean High School, who will be trained by members of eRTH in the week preceding the parade.

"The thing I'm most keen about is the fact we're actually able to work with local people," he said. "Working with the students and giving them an introduction to the work we've been doing for the last 16 years opens up a window for them to see the potential where street theatre on a grand scale can take them."

Festival organiser Dom Ferry said it was an honour to have eRTH perform.

"They don't really get out to rural towns of this size much, if at all, because when you're that large in this country you're constantly in demand and since the Olympics every major event has wanted them," he said.



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