FLASHBACK: Peter Toyer, 6, suffered injuries when attacked by a kangaroo on the Lower River last year.
FLASHBACK: Peter Toyer, 6, suffered injuries when attacked by a kangaroo on the Lower River last year.

Kangaroos in a stew prompt Valley survey

By SALLY GORDON

A UNIVERSITY of New England student study has found that cases of kangaroo aggression in developing coastal communities are becoming more prevalent.

University of New England PhD student Guy Ballard is part of a research project that is investigating the interaction between humans and kangaroos in rapidly developing areas on the Coffs-Clarence coast.

As many as 300 homes at South Grafton were issued with questionnaires about kangaroos and their behavioural patterns.

Mr Ballard said the survey has prompted researchers to look at cases of kangaroo aggression and community preferences for specie management. Mr Ballard is expecting to have a summary of the survey results in about two weeks time.

The natural resource management student said he would like to find out more about incidents involving kangaroo hostility.

"Because there were a few more incidents of kangaroo aggression than we had expected, as reported in the results, we're now going to look at communities we have already spoken to, and other areas, to ask people who have experienced negative interaction with kangaroos to contact us," he said.

"We would like to have a chat to people to see what these experiences were and determine the context of aggressive behaviour by kangaroos."

A South Grafton woman, whose daughter was attacked by a kangaroo almost four years ago, claims there are excessive numbers of kangaroos around South Grafton as a result of development.



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