YEAR 4 student Kirra Petty, 9, shows new electronic black- boards at the Clarence Valley Anglican School work.
YEAR 4 student Kirra Petty, 9, shows new electronic black- boards at the Clarence Valley Anglican School work.

Less talk, no chalk in futuristic classroom

By SALLY GORDON

TEACHERS at the Clarence Valley Anglican School could soon be ditching the conventional walk, talk and chalk teaching methods for a fun interactive white board.

Anglican School students in Daniel Bell's Grade Four Class are rapt with a new high-tech interactive whiteboard, introduced to their classroom as a pilot study five weeks ago.

According to Mr Bell, the Anglican School is one of the first schools in the Clarence Valley to utilise the interactive whiteboard in the classroom as part of their everyday teaching program.

The students are able to interact with a whiteboard-size computer screen, which is beamed onto the board via a computer-controlled projector.

The $5000 package includes a keyboard, speakers and a 'slate' which students can touch with a magic pen to control what's on the screen.

The result is a larger-than-life interactive touchscreen that kids can't keep their eyes off.

Austen Terrance Jarvis said his favourite program was a maths activity while a number of other kids raved about the 'mystic ball' problem-solving activity.

It seems for many students in Mr Bell's class, the interactive whiteboard has turned mundane textbook talk into a feast of digitalised visual and audio material.

"For a lot of the kids it's not just that it's interactive, it's the visual aspect," Mr Bell said.

"A lot of the studies show, that particularly for boys' education they tend to engage with it just so much more than your conventional walk, talk and chalk education."

He said the school was trialling the interactive whiteboard in his class and one in the computer lab.



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