Members of Clarence Valley Breast Cancer Support Group Margaret Pearson, back left, Pat Randell and Margaret O?Shea, give fello
Members of Clarence Valley Breast Cancer Support Group Margaret Pearson, back left, Pat Randell and Margaret O?Shea, give fello

More motivated than most ?

By LAURETTA GODBEE

THE first team to nominate for this year's Cancer Council Relay for Life in Grafton, also will be among the most motivated taking part in the event.

Members of the Clarence Valley Breast Cancer Support Group, many themselves survivors of breast cancer or carers for those battling the condition, will line up for the 24-hour relay, to be held on Jabour Park, South Grafton, overnight on October 15-16.

Support group chairperson and team co-ordinator Margaret O'Shea said the team had already signed up seven members, and hoped to have a complement of 10 or more on the track.

She said members had been involved with the staging of the first Grafton Relay for Life two years ago, but this would be the first time the group had entered a participating team.

Teams of 10 or more are urged to undertake pre-event fundraising for the Cancer Council and to be part of the relay.

Teams are invited to camp out overnight on-site, with an on-going program of entertainment and activities planned to support participants and spectators.

Clarence Valley relays are held in alternate years in Grafton and Maclean, with many thousands of dollars raised since the inception of the event in the Clarence Valley four years ago.

The relay opens with a survivors' lap, honouring those who have survived cancer and their carers, and climaxes with a sunset candlelight ceremony supporting those battling cancer and remembering those who have lost their fight with the dis ease.

Teams are invited to register and start fundraising as soon as possible, with nomination forms available through committee chair Denise Hyde on 66474632.

Breast Cancer Support Group team leader Margaret O'Shea said her group members had been keen to join the relay this year.

"It's a truly moving occasion and we like to do anything we can to help local people whose lives have been touched by cancer," she said.

"From our own experiences and from the great amount of information that is available we can help in many ways, sometimes most importantly, just by being a friend who understands."



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