Qld Coalition wants a dam

THE Queensland Coalition has identified piping 100,000 ML of water from the Clarence River to Queensland as 'technically and financially possible'. In a submission to the Senate Standing Committee responding to its inquiry into additional water supplies for south-east Queensland, the Coalition opposed the Queensland Government's proposed Traveston Crossing Dam. Instead, it indicated a preference to develop new water supply sources, including 'harvesting excess water from northern NSW river systems'. "A Queensland Coalition Government would investigate this option with a view to negotiating with the New South Wales Government for a cross-border water agreement for the Clarence and Tweed River catchments," the submission read. "The pipeline from the Northern Rivers to the Southern Regional Water Pipeline would be an ideal opportunity for New South Wales and Queensland to jointly apply for funding through the Federal Government's National Water Initiative." The Queensland Coalition's submission was one of more than 200 directed to the Senate Committee regarding all possible water diversion options, with submissions continuing to be received until Friday, June 1, to be considered at an additional hearing on June 4. The submission process was thrown into controversy yesterday when The Daily Examiner reported the Senate Committee failed to advertise the opening of submissions in the Clarence Valley. The closest publication notified was the Lismore-based Northern Star. The Queensland Coalition's submission follows comments made to the Senate on May 11 by Steve Costello from the National Water Commission touting the option of piping 100,000 megalitres of water a year from the Clarence River to the Logan River as being the cheapest model for that volume of water. Hansard records Mr Costello as saying a dam on the Clarence River upstream of Duck Creek with a pipeline to South East Queensland would cost around $1.73 per kilolitre. The second option discussed was a 20,000 megalitre per year extraction from the Tweed River at a cost of $1.42 per kilolitre. According to the Senate Chair, this was 'about half the cost of some of the piped water schemes in Queensland'.

THE Queensland Coalition has identified piping 100,000 ML of water from the Clarence River to Queensland as 'technically and financially possible'. In a submission to the Senate Standing Committee responding to its inquiry into additional water supplies for south-east Queensland, the Coalition opposed the Queensland Government's proposed Traveston Crossing Dam. Instead, it indicated a preference to develop new water supply sources, including 'harvesting excess water from northern NSW river systems'. "A Queensland Coalition Government would investigate this option with a view to negotiating with the New South Wales Government for a cross-border water agreement for the Clarence and Tweed River catchments," the submission read. "The pipeline from the Northern Rivers to the Southern Regional Water Pipeline would be an ideal opportunity for New South Wales and Queensland to jointly apply for funding through the Federal Government's National Water Initiative." The Queensland Coalition's submission was one of more than 200 directed to the Senate Committee regarding all possible water diversion options, with submissions continuing to be received until Friday, June 1, to be considered at an additional hearing on June 4. The submission process was thrown into controversy yesterday when The Daily Examiner reported the Senate Committee failed to advertise the opening of submissions in the Clarence Valley. The closest publication notified was the Lismore-based Northern Star. The Queensland Coalition's submission follows comments made to the Senate on May 11 by Steve Costello from the National Water Commission touting the option of piping 100,000 megalitres of water a year from the Clarence River to the Logan River as being the cheapest model for that volume of water. Hansard records Mr Costello as saying a dam on the Clarence River upstream of Duck Creek with a pipeline to South East Queensland would cost around $1.73 per kilolitre. The second option discussed was a 20,000 megalitre per year extraction from the Tweed River at a cost of $1.42 per kilolitre. According to the Senate Chair, this was 'about half the cost of some of the piped water schemes in Queensland'.



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