Brumbies safe in Curtis Island wild pig cull

WILD pigs will get the chop when a team of bacon busters descend on Curtis Island over coming weeks.

The future of the island's natural environment is at stake with pigs and other pests wreaking havoc.

The eradication of feral pigs, goats, cats and foxes will force the closure of 30,000 hectares of national park on Friday and on August 11.

The wipe-out involves aerial shooting, trapping and baiting.

Contrary to recent social media posts, wild brumbies are not a declared pest and will not be targeted during the campaigns.

A Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service spokeswoman said controlling pest species was done under strict regulations.

"This is an ongoing environmentally significant project over more than a decade to protect the island's fragile marine plain ecosystem, the endangered flatback turtle rookery and the yellow chat, an endangered bird native to Curtis Island," she said.

"Strict standards and procedures are followed in accordance with QPWS policy to provide a comprehensive, safe and efficient operational framework for all pest animal control programs."

Control programs use approved humane killing methods at all times, she said.

FAST FACTS

  • Feral pigs are the most serious pest on Curtis Island
  • 2500 pigs have been removed since mid-2005
  • A recent 30-day trapping operation removed 11 wild dogs, two cats and two foxes


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