Sunday Night journalist Mike Willesee with Bali Nine inmate Andrew Chan
Sunday Night journalist Mike Willesee with Bali Nine inmate Andrew Chan

Bali Nine's Andrew Chan pens letter from death row

THEY may be Andrew Chan's final words to the world.

The convicted drug smuggler is now kept on an isolated Indonesian island ahead of a looming execution.

Before his transfer, Chan penned a heartbreaking letter to his 15-year-old self, instructing him to follow a different path.

The letter was read aloud on Seven's Sunday Night, as part of journalist Mike Willesee's report, "The Final Days".

The missive will now be used to encourage teenagers not to become part of illegal drug trafficking.

 

Read the letter below:

Dear Me, when you're older, you will be in a Bali prison and you will be executed.

"This happened to you because you thought taking drugs was cool.

Australian Bali Nine inmate Andrew Chan, who has been sentenced to execution by firing squad for drug trafficking.
Australian Bali Nine inmate Andrew Chan, who has been sentenced to execution by firing squad for drug trafficking. FIRDIA LISNAWATI AP

"Underneath you're not a bad person and drugs made you different.

"Your family and your friends are heartbroken and your life will be ended by firing squad.

"I have missed weddings. I've missed funerals and the simple presence of my own family.

"The hurt and pain - I don't just put it on to myself.

"But the pain I put on my family is agonising.

"A simple touch, such as a hug, is not possible for a condemned man like me.

"I have nothing but an iron bar to hug rather than to be embraced by those I love and who I miss."

 

Australian filmmaker Malinda Rutter asked Chan to write the letter for her project titled 'Dear Me'.

She is no stranger to the destructive power of drugs.

Her own sister's life was lost after a heroin overdose.

But it hasn't stopped her from asking the Indonesian Government to spare the lives of Chan and fellow Bali Nine prisoner Myuran Sukumaran.
 


The Sunday Night feature includes footage and interviews from Willesee's trip to Bali's Kerobokan Prison to meet to two men last year.

The reporter revisits his own experience with the pair, describing them as "two decent human beings".

"These young Australians had come so far," he said.

"Rehabilitated, reformed, call it what you like.

"For me, they'd become decent human beings."

Chan and Sukumaran were each sentenced to death after attempted to smuggle 8.3kg of heroin from Indonesia to Australia in 2005, a haul worth $4 million.

The remainder of the nine smugglers - dubbed the Bali Nine -were given life sentences, with the exception of Renae Lawrence who received a 20 year sentence.
 


Chan and Sukumaran are now on Indonesia's Nusakambangan, where they are being kept ahead of their possible execution.

The pair's appeal against Indonesia President Joko Widodo's refusal to grant them clemency is to be heard on Thursday.


 



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