Bec Judd reveals unusual way she dealt with breastfeeding pain. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd
Bec Judd reveals unusual way she dealt with breastfeeding pain. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd

Bec Judd’s bizarre breast pain cure

Aussie footy WAG Bec Judd might be a glamorous figure known for her effortless style but she's not afraid to speak candidly about pregnancy and motherhood.

The mum-of-four recently spoke about dealing with the pain of breastfeeding and how she found relief using a natural remedy.

The 37-year-old told KIIS FM's Yumi Stynes and Kate "Monty" Dimond on Monday the only way she was able to alleviate breast pain was by using a lettuce leaf.

"The only thing that saved my boozies when I was breastfeeding Oscar (her eight-year-old son) was a lettuce leaf," she said.

"A lettuce leaf?" Yumi said in disbelief.

"I tried all the meds - the Panadol, the Voltaren - nothing worked," Judd said.

AFL WAG Bec Judd (pictured with her children) and her husband Chris Judd (far right) Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd
AFL WAG Bec Judd (pictured with her children) and her husband Chris Judd (far right) Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd

RELATED: Bec Judd's skin-tightening treatment to get rid of wrinkles

RELATED: Bec Judd complains about dirty pool after dust storms

While Judd's admission was met with a laugh from Dimond, the co-host said it wasn't entirely unusual for women to use cabbage leaves as a way of unblocking milk ducts.

"Which is interesting because it's a cabbage leaf … you're putting iceberg down there," Dimond said.

While the cabbage leaf cure might sound like an old wives' tale, a study has shown cold leaves can help reduce breast engorgement that can lead to mastitis.

Cabbage leaves contain glucosinolates which once converted by enzymes becomes isothiocyanates, a compound found in mustard oil.

Historically, mustard oil was used as natural remedy to decrease inflammation, treat arthritis and relieve body pain.

Judd said after the birth of Oscar, her breasts looked ‘ridiculous’. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd
Judd said after the birth of Oscar, her breasts looked ‘ridiculous’. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd

It's not the first time Judd has spoken openly about motherhood and childbirth.

Speaking to news.com.au previously for the launch of her new book, The Baby Bible, Judd said after the birth of her son Oscar she looked "ridiculous".

"I looked ridiculous … like Dolly Parton on steroids. I was shocked."

"Oscar, being the first, I think my boobs just freaked out. They were so hard and it was really difficult to breastfeed because you have to nuzzle in to the boob to latch on to the nipple, but because they were rock hard it was almost like he couldn't get on properly and it was really difficult."

The mum-of-four shared this photo to Instagram taken just after her eldest son Oscar was born. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd
The mum-of-four shared this photo to Instagram taken just after her eldest son Oscar was born. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd

Judd also spoke openly about the pain of childbirth, describing the moment the epidural wore off during labour as "excruciating".

"For me it was more painful," she said.

"I was a blubbering mess for two days with these bloody boobs. To touch them was like touching a wall. They were rock hard. It was awful.

"They were boiling hot. Burning hot. I was skinny arms and legs and bazookas out to here."

Judd said previously she hoped by speaking openly about pregnancy and motherhood, it might help others. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd
Judd said previously she hoped by speaking openly about pregnancy and motherhood, it might help others. Picture: Instagram/Bec Judd

One in five breastfeeding women develop mastitis during the first six months after giving birth, according to Health Direct's website.

The condition unusually develops because a milk duct has become blocked, causing milk to build up.

"Some of the milk behind the blocked duct may be forced into the surrounding breast tissue. This causes the tissue to become swollen or inflamed," the website said.

"Mastitis can also be caused by a cracked nipple allowing bacteria to enter the breast tissue."

It can be a serious condition often requiring antibiotics.

 



So long, and thanks for all the yarns

Premium Content So long, and thanks for all the yarns

Sports journalist Mitchell Keenan writes his final piece at The Daily Examiner

Bushfire recovery vouchers helps kids get back to school

Premium Content Bushfire recovery vouchers helps kids get back to school

$50,000 in vouchers have been distributed by NRCF and Social Futures to more than...

WE ASKED: Could there be a bridge at Lawrence?

Premium Content WE ASKED: Could there be a bridge at Lawrence?

After a recent breakdown of the Bluff Point Ferry near Lawrence, the question was...