Coastal emus grazing next to the Pacific Highway at Tyndale.
Coastal emus grazing next to the Pacific Highway at Tyndale.

Birdlife group fears for emus

BIRDLIFE Northern NSW has been joined by local residents, ecologists and environment groups to host a meeting with the RMS (formerly RTA) to discuss the proposed Pacific Highway Grafton bypass route.

A public meeting has been arranged for 6pm on August 31 at the Community Centre, 59 Duke St, Grafton.

The proposed route will travel from Glenugie to Tyndale via the Pillar Valley and Tucabia wetlands and then beside the Coldstream River east of Tyndale to the Harwood bridge.

Birdlife Australia, Northern NSW spokesperson Dr. Greg Clancy said: "The only suitable route that will reduce the impact on the ecosystem is the "Orange" route, which approximates the existing highway.

"It was rejected by the RMS on social and economic grounds.

"The preferred route of the bypass intersects the home range of the last significant population of the threatened coastal emu.

"There are only about 100 emus left in this isolated population.

"As well it transects the habitat of over 80 threatened flora and fauna species. Ecologically the RMS could not have chosen a worse route.

"Will this drive our local icon to extinction?"

Anyone who has concerns with this route is encouraged to attend the August 31 meeting.

Contact: Dr Greg Clancy 66493153 0429601960 gclancy@tpg.com.au



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