Boomerang Festival to make a return after successful start

ARAKWAL dancer Shamiyah Kay, 3, performed at The Boomerang Music Festival at Tyagarah on Friday.  
ARAKWAL dancer Shamiyah Kay, 3, performed at The Boomerang Music Festival at Tyagarah on Friday.   Taophotosroger Cotgreave

GLORIOUS weather and an unprecedented line-up of indigenous artists helped to propel the success of the weekend's inaugural Boomerang Festival at Tyagarah.

An excited Peter Noble said more than 5000 people attended the three day cultural extravaganza held at the home of Bluesfest, the Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm near Byron Bay.

"I am jumping out of my skin... to use the great Aussie vernacular this has been a pearler," the festival promoter said.

"I have never felt more pride in doing an event, ever.

"There can be no greater coming together than to understand our original Australians more. Every Australian gets something from that."

AMAZING NIGHT: Performer at the opening ceremony of the Boomerang Festival at Tyagarah on Friday night.
AMAZING NIGHT: Performer at the opening ceremony of the Boomerang Festival at Tyagarah on Friday night. MEGAN KINNINMENT

"We had indigenous people share their music, dancing and stories with us, and as an Australian white fella I feel I will walk out of here with much deeper roots in my country, because of my experiences."

Mr Noble said feedback from those who attended the festival will help the event continue to grow.

"People have been coming up to me saying this is what Byron Bay needs."

After four years of planning, Mr Noble said although the festival would not make a profit this year, it was more successful than the first Bluesfest.

Tickets have already been sold for next year's festival, and Mr Noble said artists had already registered to be involved in next year's event.

"Next year we will have twice as many people because this boomerang will come back."

"Give us two more years and we are going to be getting 10,000 people a day."

Mr Noble said after this year's success, he was determined to see the festival continue.

"We are going to make a profit out of it and that will show that indigenous Australia is worth investing more in."

"That's what we are doing; we are investing in the indigenous people of our country with pride."

"The world doesn't need another rock festival, it needs events like this, and that is why the Boomerang Festival will grow and succeed and probably even outlive me."

Artists including Xavier Rudd, Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, Archie Roach and John Williamson gave moving performances, embracing indigenous culture.

Festival director Rhoda Roberts said the energy of the festival inspired the audience and artists.

"The energy of the space has been extraordinary, everyone has been laughing and hugging, it's just a wonderful atmosphere," she said.

Audiences came to discover the Boomerang Festival was more than just music. Indigenous dancers, speakers, comedians and films, all proved popular. Workshops were booked out.

"People know that it's not just a music festival, it's also about workshops and experiences and conversations."



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