PAIN RELIEF: Julia Moralez discovered she had scoliosis at 17, too late for preventative treatment.
PAIN RELIEF: Julia Moralez discovered she had scoliosis at 17, too late for preventative treatment. Caitlan Charles

Bowen therapy cuts Julia’s chronic pain

CLARENCE Valley resident Julia Moralez was 17 when she was diagnosed with scoliosis, beyond the age where preventative action could be taken.

"I was past the age where a brace would benefit, as it needs to be corrected while you are still growing," the now 24-year-old said.

"Basically, there wasn't much to do except live with it."

But that left Ms Moralez open to years of chronic pain and in tears on a daily basis.

"I was in constant pain, from when I got up in the morning to at night and even during sleep," Ms Moralez said.

"The pain worsened quite a bit over the past year when I started working two jobs, both on my feet constantly and anywhere from 40 to 60 hours a week.

"Over time it got quite bad and I defiantly overdid it."

Ms Moralez was referred to a physiotherapist by her GP but the treatment didn't help as much as she hoped.

"While helpful, there was no immediate reduction of pain," she said.

With scoliosis awareness month falling in June, Ms Moralez wanted to highlight that there are treatments available to help with chronic pain similar to hers.

"Bowen therapy has made a huge difference in my quality of life. The past few months have been really difficult, being in constant pain is exhausting. I was irritable and miserable. I'm so grateful that the past few weeks I've had very little pain," Ms Moralez said.

Helen Dobra from Clarence Valley Bowen Therapy said the treatment was used to help mild scoliosis and sometimes more severe cases.

"The current medical treatment is invasive surgery," she said.

"People are going with surgical options when their kids are of a young age."

"It's quite a traumatic operation."

Ms Dobra said Bowen is a way to manage scoliosis long term and she has been seeing vast improvements in her patients within only a few sessions.

"Within three treatments I'm seeing a reduction in pain by more than 50%, often to the 70% and more with pain reduction," she said.

Ms Dobra said people needed to be aware of the alternative treatments available rather than surgery.



‘Viable and effective’: the Anglican Church’s full statement on closures

Premium Content ‘Viable and effective’: the Anglican Church’s full statement on...

Decision brings and end to more than 100 years of history in Coramba and Glenreagh...

Animals, plants queue up for bushfire recovery grants

Premium Content Animals, plants queue up for bushfire recovery grants

More money to save native species a year on from devastating bushfires

Will the Coffs/Clarence get its ‘Indiana Jones experience’?

Premium Content Will the Coffs/Clarence get its ‘Indiana Jones experience’?

Quest to open ‘one heck of a community asset’ to the public gathers steam