Patrick Kennedy, Reverend Trent Minton, Dave Mansfield, Dave Langley and Ron Balderston head off for a leg on the Smashing Cycles of Poverty ride.
Patrick Kennedy, Reverend Trent Minton, Dave Mansfield, Dave Langley and Ron Balderston head off for a leg on the Smashing Cycles of Poverty ride. Contributed

Breaking cycle of poverty

A CLAN of cyclists has passed through the Northern Rivers in an attempt to raise $1 million to help smash the devastating cycles of poverty overseas and in Australia.

The group from Anglican Aid cycled between Alstonville and Maclean yesterday on their 2500km journey from Sydney to Noosa Heads via Tamworth and Brisbane and back to Sydney down the coast.

One of the cyclists, Patrick Kennedy, said the cyclists, who have less than two weeks to go and have travelled more than 1700km in the past fortnight on their Smashing Cycles of Poverty trip, were amazed with the reception from motorists.

"Motorists are waving, tooting their horns and getting right out of our way. They are being very gracious," Mr Kennedy said.

Mr Kennedy said they had been inspired by the huge difference in the way money was treated in countries around the world.

"One child dies every 13 seconds from hunger - Australians spend $400 million on the Melbourne Cup. And yet outside of Australia, in Third World countries, they don't even have enough to survive," he said.

He said their main aim was to get the message of poverty out there and they were happy to be joined on some of their legs by locals.

On their leg yesterday, the assistant minister from Alstonville Anglican Church, Reverend Trent Minton, was riding with the team.

CEO of Anglican Aid David Mansfield said the small band of cyclists was racing against time as they tried to save as many people in the developing world as possible.

"One of our many aims through our Smashing Cycles of Poverty initiative is to raise enough money to rebuild 100 flood-proof homes, which were destroyed in the Indian village of Vizag district of Andhra Pradesh, south-east India, during devastating storms and floods in 2012."

 

Poverty

  • More than 1.3 billion people in the world live on less than $1.25 a day
  • Another 2.6 billion live on less than $2 a day

FACTS: Anglican Aid



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