Clarence Valley Council has been awarded funding to tackle persistent weeds invading areas that were severely affected by last summer's bushfires, including the invasive tropical soda apple.
Clarence Valley Council has been awarded funding to tackle persistent weeds invading areas that were severely affected by last summer's bushfires, including the invasive tropical soda apple.

Bushfire recovery funding to tackle invasive weeds

More than $140,000 has been awarded to Clarence Valley Council to combat the spread of invasive weeds in areas severely affected by last summer’s bushfires.

Weed species being targeted include giants rats tail grass, Sporobolus pyramidalis and tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum, an aggressively invasive, perennial shrub that grows to 1-2m.

CVC manager for open spaces and facilities Peter Birch said when the fires tore through the landscape it invariably left the soil bare and vulnerable to invasion by opportunistic weeds.

“The funding from North Coast Local Land Services under the NSW Government Bushfire Stimulus Recovery Project, will enable us to assist landholders to tackle some of the worst weeds in bushfire affected communities,” Mr Birch said.

“We will be controlling infestations of tropical soda apple (TSA) in Glenreagh, Kangaroo Creek, on private properties and other priority sites.

“Dubbed the ‘weed from hell’, TSA it is a prickly, thicket forming nightmare for landowners. It is critical that we make inroads into controlling this weed before it becomes more widespread.”

Clarence Valley Council has been awarded funding to tackle persistent weeds invading areas that were severely affected by last summer's bushfires, including the invasive tropical soda apple.
Clarence Valley Council has been awarded funding to tackle persistent weeds invading areas that were severely affected by last summer's bushfires, including the invasive tropical soda apple.

Mr Birch said additional funding from North Coast Local Land Services will be allocated to follow up inspections in control areas and spent on advising landholders on how to best deal with it.

Another weed on the hit list is giants rats tail grass, which will be treated in the Ewingar area where the tall, flammable grass has invaded pasture, replacing more productive grasses.

“It forms dense tussocks that replace native plants and increases the risk of fire,” he said.

“Landholders are still struggling to recover from the devastation of last years fires and the last thing they need is to have a new battle on their hands with invading priority weeds.”

A free 2021 – No Space for Weeds calendar, has detailed information about weeds in our area and control techniques. Look for it at your local rural store.

Further weed control information can be found if you go to the NSW WeedWise website: weeds.dpi.nsw.gov.au.



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