Phyllis Last turns 100

Century marks a lifetime of love for Ulmarra's Phyllis Last

WITH 100 years under her belt, it's safe to say Phyllis Last has made a lasting impression on those around her.

The Ulmarra resident celebrated her century milestone at Rathgar Lodge yesterday surrounded by family, who came from as far as Melbourne and Townsville.

"It's lovely to see them all, but when I say see, I mean I can only really see shapes," Mrs Last noted cheerfully.

Mrs Last was born in Redruth in Cornwall and migrated to Australia with her mother as a toddler, after her father failed to come back from the First World War.

In 1933 she married Christopher Last in Sydney.

They were together 75 years, until he died six years ago at the age of 95, and raised four children - Neil, Cliff, Ralph and Wendy.

That family has now extended to include eight grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and 8 great-great grandchildren.

CELEBRATE: Phyllis Last (centre) celebrates her 100th birthday at Rathgar Lodge with five generations of her immediate family. Photo: Adam Hourigan
CELEBRATE: Phyllis Last (centre) celebrates her 100th birthday at Rathgar Lodge with five generations of her immediate family. Photo: Adam Hourigan

"Family, that's what it's all about," she said.

"We've had a lovely life. I miss (Chris) very much."

Son Neil said "if dad was here he'd be standing behind her with a big cheesy grin on his face".

"He absolutely worshipped her."

Neil said his mum was a loving matriarch who instilled her children with good values.

"One of my earliest memories of mum was the feather duster; that was her means of admonishing us," he laughed.

"She was always running around the backyard after one of the kids- usually me. But I think we all grew up pretty good."

When asked for her secrets to longevity, the centenarian answered it might have something to do with living a "nice quiet life."

Mrs Last has never been a drinker, although her grandchildren still tease her about being so drunk she dances on tables.

"I've seen a lot of changes in my time," she said.

"There were no drugs or anything when I was growing up and we didn't have to worry about going for a walk at night."

Now she spends most of her time close to home, and is thankful she can still read her mystery stories.

"If they take reading away from me, I've had it," she said.



Victa boat motors on display

Victa boat motors on display

A piece of history at the Show

A cute new member for The McClymonts

A cute new member for The McClymonts

The McClymonts have a new band member, and she's super cute.

Worlds smallest cucumber wins big at the Grafton Show

Worlds smallest cucumber wins big at the Grafton Show

Produce Pavilion at the Grafton Show a big hit with small cucumbers

Local Partners