HIVE OF ACTIVITY: Clarence Native Bees organiser Laura Noble, Toni Kearney from Bunnings and Clarence River U3a's Men's Shed's Brent Walsh get together to help build native stingless bee boxes at day at Bunnings
HIVE OF ACTIVITY: Clarence Native Bees organiser Laura Noble, Toni Kearney from Bunnings and Clarence River U3a's Men's Shed's Brent Walsh get together to help build native stingless bee boxes at day at Bunnings Adam Hourigan

Community working bee was a real buzz

BUNNINGS was a hive of activity last Wednesday when busy worker bees from disability groups across the Clarence Valley took part in a native bee box construction project.

Clarence Native Bees Group, Clarence River U3a Men's Shed and Bunnings DIY worked together with clients from Caringa My Life Program and Maclean Disability Services to build and paint 43 bee boxes, which will help provide new homes for native bees in the bush.

Clarence Native Bees Group project organiser Laura Noble said everyone was excited to be a part of the project.

"It was a good day, very packed and chaotic but it was a lot of fun," she said.

"Some were painting, and some were gluing and bashing and screwing things in. I don't think anyone hit their thumbs so that was excellent.

"The goal was to really get members from different community groups together working on the one project to build some bee boxes for Clarence Native Bees Group. Everyone was working together which was great to see."

Members of Clarence River U3a Men's Shed cut the timber to size and prepared ready-to-build packs for the boxes.

Mrs Noble said the project was funded by a community grant from the Australian Government National Landcare Programme, with the new boxes used to rehouse stingless native bees after their natural hives are damaged or destroyed.

"Native bees tend to stay in one place for generations, and if their hive is destroyed they might not be able to easily regenerate," she said.

"As soon as a nest is exposed, that scent attracts predators like ants and wasps and other beetles and the native bees don't stand a chance.

"More bush is disappearing with the new highway being built, so the more people who are interested in native bees who can support them and build up their population, the better their chances are of survival."



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