Cattle had to be released from the wreckage after the B-double crashed.
Cattle had to be released from the wreckage after the B-double crashed.

Cows still on the loose

COWS remained on the loose yesterday, following a cattle truck smash on the Gwydir Highway west of Grafton early on Tuesday morning.

It was confirmed yesterday around $22,000 worth of stock was lost when the B-double overturned 13 kilometres west of Grafton.

The B-double was carrying 107 cattle, young and old stock. Twenty died in the smash and 30 were put down.

Clarence Valley Council senior ranger Errol Woods, called to the accident at 1.30am, was forced to destroy 30 animals.

“Around 20 were killed by the accident and we had to destroy a further 30, while stockmen contained the remainder of them in yards,” he said.

“The surviving cattle were taken to South Grafton Abattoir in a good condition.”

Campbell Wreckers staff worked throughout the day to free cattle trapped underneath the truck.

Stocktrans supervisor John Matthewson said some cattle were missing but was confident they would be rounded up.

“The truck was carrying a very mixed load of young and old but I would say they were approximately worth $450 each in today’s market,” he said.

It is believed the trailer detached from the prime mover after overturning, sending the cabin into a nearby creek.

The driver sustained minor injuries and was taken to Grafton Base Hospital.

The road was closed for 15 hours while fire crews, police, RTA and council cleaned up the area. The cause of the accident is being investigated.



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