FILM MAKER: Max Hoffman, 17 of Maclean, has been commissioned to create videos for the plunge festival.
FILM MAKER: Max Hoffman, 17 of Maclean, has been commissioned to create videos for the plunge festival. Adam Hourigan

Max takes plunge for festival

CREATING the video to launch the Clarence Valley's major cultural event of the year will pay off big time for a Maclean teenager.

Max Hoffman, who just turned 17, is waiting for his first "big" payday as a video maker after his video highlighting the Valley's culture was chosen to premiere at the launch of the 2016 Plunge Festival.

"I can hardly wait to get the money so I can upgrade my camera," Max said.

The budding cinematographer was almost apologetic when he admitted shooting the video on his Nikon D7200.

He edited the job himself on Sony Vegas and After Effects software.

"I bought my first camera about 10 months ago, and ever since then I have been just filming random things wherever I went and making short videos," he said.

"Anything I didn't know I would stay up until early hours of the morning trying to find out."

The process has also instilled a desire to make this sort of work into a career.

"The editing side of film really appeals to me," he said.

"I aspire to be a cinematographer and director for small projects like music videos, advertisements, etc rather then big projects like feature films and stuff."

Shooting and editing the job involved travelling around the Clarence Valley for a couple of weeks shooting video clips.

"(Plunge co-ordinator) Lou Gumb gave me a list of things I should include," he said.

"I probably spent most of the time shooting and the last few days editing the shots together."

The commission Max has from the Clarence Valley Council is to shoot this video plus two others during the festival.

"They've agreed to pay me for the videos as well as my public liability insurance," he said.

Ms Gumb said she had been impressed with the "eye" Max had for making videos.

"He has the ability to see things in objects we would normally just walk past and make them special," she said.

"I've talked to people like Sue Swinburn from Griffith Uni about his work and they're all impressed with his work."

She was also impressed with his professional approach.

"All the things I gave him to do, he did straight away. He just got on the phone and called them without any fuss."

Max thanked the Clarence Valley Council and Plunge's Lou Gumb for giving him the chance.



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