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Sleeping through daylight saving

The introduction of daylight saving can affect your mental health, says an expert.
The introduction of daylight saving can affect your mental health, says an expert. Tatjana Strelkova

DAYLIGHT saving contributes to poor mental health, according to a psychologist.

Southern Cross University's James Donnelly, of the School of Health and Human Services, said studies had shown there was a rise in heart attacks and workplace accidents following the introduction of DST.

"People are sleep deprived anyway," Dr Donnelly said.

"They have sleep debt and daylight saving can bankrupt them.

"When daylight saving happens it's usually on the weekend when people have been up late the day before."

He said it was a "triple whammy" with sleep deprivation, daylight saving and the consumption of alcohol.

"Daylight saving does give people the opportunity to stop and re-evaluate their sleeping patterns," he said.

He said people should avoid drinking alcohol on the weekend, caffeine at the end of the day and working on the computer late at night.

Dr Donnelly said about 80% of people would not feel the effects.

Daylight saving came into effect for NSW on Sunday morning.

Topics:  daylight savings sleep



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