If you see an animal in distress, contact the RSPCA's 24/7 Animal Emergency Hotline 1300 ANIMAL.     
If you see an animal in distress, contact the RSPCA's 24/7 Animal Emergency Hotline 1300 ANIMAL.      Chantel Renae Photography

Dogs found dead as Queensland seared by heatwave

TWO dogs have been confirmed dead after perishing in yesterday's heatwave.

Penny Woodhead posted to a local Facebook page encouraging pet owners to keep an eye on their dogs after losing two of her beloved pets.

"Please look after your babies," she wrote.

"My husband found them when he got home from work this afternoon and I am away for work."

Mrs Woodhead said the dogs both had plenty of shade and water, but the heat was just too much.

"We were both out for work and only live in a tiny farmhouse with generator power so fans and air con weren't an option or I would have them on all day."

Dog swelters in car

On the same day, a shopper at Warwick IGA was startled to find a dog locked inside a ute.

The concerned woman posted to Facebook a photo of the dog, before it's owners returned and drove away.

Boiled alive

A dog was found boiled alive by the extreme heat yesterday, tied to a clothesline with no shelter, shade or water.

The gruesome discovery comes days after the animal welfare organisation pleaded with owners to ensure their pets were adequately cared for during the heatwave.

A desperate RSPCA spokesperson Michael Beatty said clearly the message wasn't getting through. 

The 'boiled' dog was found at Urangan, Hervey Bay by the duty inspector, who said the dog was dead by 10am.

Already this week, before the extreme weekend temperatures, the RSPCA was being swamped with calls about pets in heat distress. 

Between Thursday last week and three days ago, the RSPCA responded to 28 calls about animals locked in hot cars, 62 for animals with little or no shade and 110 calls about animals left with insufficient water. 

"These numbers are horrifying. Some people are simply not listening," Mr Beatty said earlier this week.   

"If it's 30 degrees outside, the temperature inside a car can potentially rise to well over 40 degrees in less than five minutes.

"We tested a light coloured sedan and the temperatures rose to 57 degrees in 12 minutes. Any animal left inside would have been dead."  

How to protect your dog

Dogs don't sweat, so cooling down occurs through panting, lying on a cool surface and drinking cool water.  

Signs of heat stress in your pet can include relentless panting, drooling, agitation, restlessness, very red or pale gums, bright red tongue, increased heart rate, breathing distress, vomiting and diarrhoea, possibly with blood.  

If an animal has heat stress, prompt action is needed if a positive outcome is to be achieved.

First aid measures should be applied quickly and the animal must then be transported to a veterinarian immediately.

Never transport an animal while they are still hot.  

Cooling them down first is essential. Bathing the animal in cool (not cold) water is one of the best ways to cool them down, or apply ice packs to the groin and underarm area, or place them in front of a fan or in an air-conditioned room.  

The animal should also be offered cool, fresh water to bring their temperature down.  

Once the animal is cool always take them to the vet as they may have internal damage from the heat stress.  

If you see an animal in distress, contact the RSPCA's 24/7 Animal Emergency Hotline 1300 ANIMAL.     



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