WE SAY: Effective sanctions the key in Ukraine

OUR VIEW: THE spectre of the MH17 horror seems set to haunt the world for some time yet.

As the remains of some of the victims who were on the doomed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands yesterday, two more Ukrainian aircraft were shot down by separatist rebels using Russian weaponry.

There is no doubt the rebels have been backed by Russia, and evidence grows that the Russian military has been involved, too.

The problem, though, cannot be solved, as some have suggested, by targeting Russian leader Vladimir Putin.

Granted, if Mr Putin is trying to stop the violence in Ukraine's east, his efforts have fallen well short of what is needed.

But Ukraine's Russian "rebellion", for want of a better word, is about money.

It is caught in the grip of a lust for controlling fuel, and all the wealth that goes with it. Russia is now among the most aggressively capitalist countries in the world. Reports have the number of Russian billionaires on a par with China's - more than 60 - and only beaten by the US.

The only way to put effective pressure on the Russians is, as the US and United Nations propose, with strict trade sanctions.

But with the European Union - particularly Germany - still doing brisk and lucrative business with Russia, the future of the Ukraine conflict remains uncomfortably murky.



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