The effects of wakeboarding on erosion on the Clarence River is being studied by the University of NSW Water Research Laboratory.
The effects of wakeboarding on erosion on the Clarence River is being studied by the University of NSW Water Research Laboratory. The Daily Examiner

Methods used in Clarence River erosion analysis defended

A STUDY into the effects of wake boats using the Clarence River will use all the latest equipment to gather information, says a spokesman for a group promoting use of the Clarence River.

Seelands tourism park operator Travis Stone, who is a member of the Clarence River Awareness Group, disputes claims by a Seelands resident that the University of NSW Water Research Laboratory Study will use 10-year-old boats during tests in a study commissioned by the Clarence Valley Council.

Mr Stone said he has spoken to the head of the study, Dr Will Glamore, and could assure people the study would use modern wake boats to test their effects on riverbanks.

Earlier this week a Seelands resident, John Griffith, questioned the methodology of the study.

He claimed the study would use older wake boats that didn't use the new technology that enabled them to generate bigger waves than older vessels, causing some residents in the area to disown the study.

Mr Stone said his group supported the study, which he said would direct the latest research into the issue of bank erosion in the river.

"We don't know what this study is going to find," he said.

"We don't know if it's flood causing the erosion or people clearing the riverbanks right down to the water or wakes from the boats.

"It might be the outcome of this study won't support wakeboarding in the river."

Mr Stone said his group supported all types of river usage, from anglers to wake boats.

"We're trying to find a happy medium between all the people who want to use the river," Mr Stone said.

"We also have to balance the interests of boat owners and landowners."

Clarence Valley Council general manager Scott Greensill said the study would provide independent scientific information to help all stakeholders and agencies with an interest in the river.

Roads and Maritime Services and Local Land Services are funding the research, along with a small council contribution.

The Daily Examiner attempted to contact Dr Glamore, who is in the area, but he did not return our calls by late yesterday.



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