Born at Maclean, Don Cameron lived and worked on the family farm for virtually his entire life, raising the family who affectionately farewelled him at a packed funeral yesterday.
Born at Maclean, Don Cameron lived and worked on the family farm for virtually his entire life, raising the family who affectionately farewelled him at a packed funeral yesterday.

Family farewells Donald Cameron

THE family of Donald Cameron buried their beloved “Pa Cammie” yesterday, but their memories of a wise and fun-loving man will live on.

Donald Henry Colin Cameron was born on October 14, 1919, at Maclean and he died there almost 92 years later.

For all but the final eight weeks of that time Mr Cameron was active in the local community.

Brought up on the family farm at Chatsworth Island, Mr Cameron's early years were filled with schooling then working in the general store at Chatsworth.

His only break with the community came in 1941 when he joined the army and spent the next two years working for its transport section around Sydney.

He also found time in 1942 to marry his childhood friend Iris Causley, and together the couple produced three daughters, Evelyn, Ann and Joy.

On his return from war service, the couple moved into a house in Chatsworth for a short time, before swapping homes with his parents on their farm.

They had lived on the farm ever since.

Originally a dairy and cane farm, over the years Mr Cameron switched solely to sugar.

But he also found plenty of time for his great hobbies of gardening and fishing for the elusive blackfish.

And also for his children, who over the years presented him with an ever-growing crop of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Mr Cameron also meant a lot to the Maclean community.

St James' Anglican Church was filled to overflowing yesterday as 300 people came to pay their respects to a man who had been president of the show society for nine years, a Rotarian, member of the poultry club, lawn bowler, an advocate of the Chatsworth school and member of countless other organisations.

“When he was 17 or 18 he was a member of the Chatsworth School P&C and in 1936 he went off to Sydney to represent young farmers,” said his youngest daughter, Joy Lee.

Even in his advanced years Mr Cameron maintained an active life.

“It was only the last six to eight weeks he found he couldn't get around and do things,” Mrs Lee said.

Yesterday his family paid a fitting farewell to a man with a fine Scottish heritage, who loved the music of the bagpipes.

Grandson Matthew played the pipes as the coffin entered the church and another grandson, Duncan, piped him on the way to the cemetery.

Six more grandsons carried their Pa's coffin from the church.



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