Lifestyle

Family’s nine went to war

Noel Gorman - his father was one of nine soldiers in World War I from Grafton. Photo Adam Hourigan / The Daily Examiner
Noel Gorman - his father was one of nine soldiers in World War I from Grafton. Photo Adam Hourigan / The Daily Examiner Adam Hourigan

DURING wartime it wasn't uncommon for families to farewell their sons to the battlefields, however doing it nine times over was a little more out of the ordinary.

The Gorman family of Grafton had eleven children, with two daughters Alice and Mary, and nine soldiers, Jim, Michael, Jack, Reg, Thomas, Leo, Bill, Bernie and Geoffrey.

Each son joined the army voluntarily, ready and willing to fight for his country on the battlefields. However only one made it out of Australian waters for the First World War.

Thomas Gorman's son Noel remembers his father and uncles fondly from when he was a little tacker nipping at their heels.

"Those boys always got along from what I remember," Mr Gorman said.

"They had their rows but that is just something that happens. They were always with each other.

"Even when I was a young bloke about seven or eight they would let me sit with them and join in on what they were doing together. They were all terrific blokes."

"It's just a shame that after the war when they were all meant to come home, they just scattered across the country."

The Gorman family owned a homestead on the outskirts of town where all the family was raised and where Thomas began raising his own family.

Noel can remember being raised in a shed on the side of the home-stead and being constantly surrounded by family.

"We had a homestead down what they used to call Gormans Lane.

"I don't know if that is what it is called now or if the house even exists anymore. The house was right on the corner of the lane. It wasn't a big place but it was big enough for us."

"After a while we shifted from the homestead further into town in Queen St and that is when the boys left for the war."

"My father went down to Sydney with the AIF (Australian Imperial Force) but I don't much know what he was doing for them. He wasn't in the army for long before he returned back home."

For Noel Gorman, who also served his country, there is a great pride in coming from a long line of military men.

"Damn yes, I am proud of them," he said. "I thank all of the boys that served this beautiful country in the wars."

Topics:  soldiers war ww1



NPWS workers concerned for the future

OUTCRY: The Clarence Valley community comes out in support of National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Community comes out in support of National Parks workers.

Clarence Valley Petrol and Weather

Where will you fill up the car today?

Grab the weather forecast and where to get the cheapest petrol today

Road works on the move

NEW ROADS: The highway north of the Woolgoolga bypass is set to open to traffic later this month.

Traffic will be diverted onto the new section of the Pacific Highway

Local Partners

$10 lipstick better than expensive brands

APPAREL brand Sportsgirl has never been a front-runner when it comes to cosmetics. So how do their new range of lipsticks, foundations and palettes stack up?

Volvo's new Polestar offshoot blazing electric trail

Polestar, a new stand-alone premium electric-vehicle company owned by Volvo

Volvo's new premium brand Polestar is gunning for Tesla.

The Aldi special buy you won't be getting

Shoppers outside discount supermarket chain Aldi. Picture: Rohan Kelly

Australian ALDI shoppers will miss out on another popular item

Return of Honda Type R shows poise and punch

The Honda Civic Type R has returned.

The prized Honda Type R has made a triumphant return.

Does your home town feature in winning travel video?

Weather at Maroochydore Beach at 9.30am.

Alexandra Franco wins people's choice award called Queensland.

Mum tells how she lost six dress sizes

TRANSFORMATION: Jacinta Dickenson dropped six dress sizes in 18 months.

In just 18 months, Jacinta Dickenson turned her life around.

How Toowoomba blogger made $400 in two days

Toowoomba blogger Bindy Scott with husband Trent and their children LuLu and Tommy.

Documenting her everyday life as a wife and mother