Flying foxes in the Northern Rivers are struggling this year. These are some of the rescues Lorraine Black has met as a carer for the Northern Rivers Wildlife Carer's.
Flying foxes in the Northern Rivers are struggling this year. These are some of the rescues Lorraine Black has met as a carer for the Northern Rivers Wildlife Carer's. Ted Baker

Flying foxes on the Northern Rivers are starving

AFTER experiencing the two extremes in weather forecasts in the last year, Northern Rivers Wildlife Carers are seeing an influx of stranded, weak and endangered bats.

Wildlife carer Lorraine Black said she has been tending to 15 bats a day in Casino as more grow weak due to starvation.

"I am getting them in from starvation mainly, although I feel like in the last few of days they are coming in when they become unstuck in flight and end up going downhill and landing on the ground," Ms Black said.

"They are fairly weak this year with the lack of flowering, and wide spread storms which are knocking out the pollen, nectar and fruit."

"When they come to me the first thing is re-hydration."

Black flying foxes, grey-headed flying foxes and little red flying foxes have been circling the Northern Rivers this summer and are increasingly under threat due to heat and less feed.

Ms Black said she gets the odd call from residents through the wildlife carers hotline to find these defenceless bats, but she also goes down to the colony more than once a day with her friend, Ted Baker, to rescue more bats down there.

"We go down usually four times a day, we find them on the ground, hanging on the tree lower than they should be or trying to climb up the truck of the tree of which they have fallen off," she said.

All the people involved with the Northern Rivers Wildlife Carer's are volunteers and use their own funds to home, feed and strengthen the sick animals.

"It's hard because when they first come in they require a lot of feeds to get their strength back up."

Ms Black said for the length of time she has been volunteering she could potentially bought a house with her money spent on saving the bats and snakes in the region.

"You go and buy a full watermelon, because it is full of sugar and fluid and its going to cost you $16 for a decent melon," she said.

If you find a sick or endangered animal in your area, call 02 6628 1866 or visit https://www.wildlifecarers.com/.



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