Former drug trafficker Benjamin Kinmont Amos embraced Christianity and found new friends, Brisbane Supreme Court was told.
Former drug trafficker Benjamin Kinmont Amos embraced Christianity and found new friends, Brisbane Supreme Court was told. John Weekes

From drug dealer to preacher

A PREACHER and a mother of four sold about $50,000 of drugs a month - but blew profits on their own addictions, and by selling ice on credit. 

Benjamin Kinmont Amos and Lynda Sue-Anne Hill were nabbed after police targeted Sunshine Coast drug dealers in 2015. 

Brisbane Supreme Court heard the duo pleaded guilty to weapon possession as well as drug charges after police found a taser, revolver, mace, and a bat with spikes. 

Hill, 37, was law-abiding before getting hooked on ice and entering the drug trade with Amos, 45. 

They were partners during the trafficking stint, with revenue of about $245,000 in five months. 

On Wednesday, Justice Debra Mullins said Hill was the "more influential" partner. 

Prosecutor Sandra Cupina said despite a police raid in February 2015, the duo kept selling drugs to street-level dealers and to users. 

The court heard Hill and Amos compelled customers who owed money to pay back debts by selling drugs. 

But life changed dramatically for both in custody before sentencing.

Amos converted to Christianity and is now involved in preaching.

And Hill had a baby while in jail. 

"Quite frankly this is, this has to be, the turning point in your life," Justice Mullins told Amos. 

She said Amos had schizophrenia, his ice addiction was in remission, and he could stay "planted in reality" with appropriate treatment. 

The judge said Amos now had a "support network" of churchgoing people willing to help him. 

He was sentenced to eight years' jail for trafficking, the most serious of 19 charges faced. 

Having already served 1071 days in custody, Amos was eligible to apply for parole at once. 

Leaving the dock, he smiled, giving the thumbs-up to supporters. 

Hill faced 43 charges, the most serious also being trafficking. 

Her barrister, Damian Walsh, said Hill once worked in retail, earning promotion to management before collapsing at work due to a blood disorder. 

Justice Mullins said Hill had "many years of being a good mother" and worthwhile community member ahead if she stayed off drugs. 

Hill was sentenced to five years' jail, wholly suspended, and immediately released on parole.

- NewsRegional



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