DONE AND DUSTED: Alstonville High School 2015 student Jess Hauenstein from Knockrow, thrilled to have finished her HSC exams.
DONE AND DUSTED: Alstonville High School 2015 student Jess Hauenstein from Knockrow, thrilled to have finished her HSC exams. Marc Stapelberg

Year 12 curriculum gets an academic overhaul

NEW year 12 syllabuses for NSW were greeted with a positive reception by regional academics and teachers, who said the reforms will better equip the teachers and students of the future.

Southern Cross University lecturer Peter Cook and director of curriculum at Trinity Catholic College Alison Unwin joined more than 7000 teachers, students, professional associations, industry representatives and academics to welcome the changes.

English, maths, science and history subject curriculum overhaul plans were revealed yesterday by the NSW Education Standards Authority, formerly the Board of Studies.

The 19 new stage 6 syllabuses, which aim to better prepare students for the workforce and further study, will be taught to Year 11 students from 2018 and to Year 12 students from 2019.

The new NESA syllabuses are part of the NSW Government's Stronger HSC Standards reforms announced last year.

It is the first time the HSC programme has been give a shake-up in 20 years and its long overdue according to Ms Unwin.

"I think holistically the reforms are much needed in relation to the HSC," Ms Unwin said.

"I think it's going to beneficial for our young people to ensure school is appropriate for the big wide world."

Ms Unwin said the reforms are aligned with our digital and ever-changing society.

"It's tailored to students but it is also tailored to the needs of what society needs us to do for out kids."

With the roll out of the new syllabuses to begin as early as next year, Ms Unwin said schools must embrace effective management practices to best cope with the upcoming reforms.

"It's a tight turn around in that there is a lot of work to be done in not only up-skilling teachers but resourcing schools in prep for that new curriculum," she said.

Mr Cook said adaptable teaching is central in nurturing the next generation of high school teachers because of the education industry's constant state of change.

He said the university is in "a very good position" because they has pre-empted some of these changes such as offering strong courses in numeracy and literacy.

"Our job is to equip our future teachers the best we possibly can," Mr Cook said.

"I would say that without a doubt we would always welcome change because it really does address needed change for our students and the students of the future that they are teaching,"



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