LESS IS MORE: Theunis Smit of South Africa looks at a macadamia plantation near Palmers Island as he held a series  of talks with local farmers on water usage for the macadamia crop.
LESS IS MORE: Theunis Smit of South Africa looks at a macadamia plantation near Palmers Island as he held a series of talks with local farmers on water usage for the macadamia crop. Adam Hourigan

Going nuts over water use on our latest local crop

WITH drought conditions plaguing farmers across the country, every drop of water saved is vital.

Hence our local macadamia producers flocked to hear South African horticultural researcher Theunis Smit. Through talks and farm visits, Mr Smit gave them real-world solutions to manage water usage with their crops, and keep them viable despite the current shortage.

"We are trying to show them how much water they need to grow macadamias successfully, and see how we can stretch what they have available to them,” Mr Smit said.

He said they were trying to show farmers methods that even if the water was available, there were methods to help save it no matter the conditions.

He said he could already see many local farmers conserving water, with methods such as mulching of the plants.

"Water is expensive.

"We're showing them ways how they can use less water and often get better results than what they may have had in the past, which can save people a lot of water they thought they needed,” Mr Smit said.

The workshop was presented by the Australian Macadamia Society.

The workshops were also presented in the growing areas of Gympie and Bundaberg last week.



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