Have your say on fish stocking plan

ANGLERS and fishing clubs are being urged to ensure their submissions on the proposed native freshwater fish stocking plan for 2016/17 are received before the end of the month.

The NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) is responsible for stocking public dams and lakes across NSW to ensure the continuation of quality recreational fishing and conservation of biodiversity.

"It's crucial the community makes submissions on where we should concentrate our fish stocking in the upcoming season so that we can do our best to conserve threatened species and improve biodiversity in local waterways," NSW DPI Inland Recreational Fisheries manager Craig Watson said.

"We consider sites for stocking based on extensive consultation with fishing clubs, community groups and environmental societies and the physical condition of the streams and dams themselves.

"The creation of new fishing locations is just as important as maintaining existing ones," he said.

The bass, trout, perch and Murray cod fish fry or fingerlings released during the stocking program are produced at the DPI Hatcheries at Narrandera, Ebor (near Armidale), Jindabyne and Port Stephens.

DPI Fisheries staff have conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the freshwater fish stocking and a management strategy to ensure the stocking is carried out using Best Practice guidelines.

Funding of the hatcheries and the stocking plan comes from the NSW Recreational Fishing Licence fees and is distributed by the Recreational Fishing Trust.

"In recent years we have seen production at our hatcheries increase and we have more fish to stock in NSW waters," Mr Watson said.

Submissions are due by April 28.



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