HE WAS as a loving husband, father, brother and grandfather but Wayne Rogers was more than that - he was a fighter.

He was put through the wringer in his life and took every battle as it came.

When Mr Rogers was 26 he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and over time his kidney function slowly declined until he experienced kidney failure in his early-50s.

The disease is hereditary and both his father, who died from it, and his son, Grant, have been diagnosed.

With the aid of dialysis three times a week he survived five-and-a-half years before he was given a transplant in 2010.

The father-of-three spent six months in a Brisbane hospital to help fight rejection.

It was a long haul for him and his family and he required repeated plasma treatments.

During this time he was told there was a high risk of infection and other cancers because of the anti-rejection medication.

WAYNE'S WISH: Craig Walsh, Peter Knight, Matt Farthing, Shanyn Limpus (organiser), Grant Rogers (organiser) and Seb Harris are part of a concert at the Moncrieff Entertainment Centre to help raise funds for the local renal unit and the Cancer Council. Photo: Mike Knott / NewsMail
WAYNE'S WISH: Craig Walsh, Peter Knight, Matt Farthing, Shanyn Limpus (organiser), Grant Rogers (organiser) and Seb Harris are part of a concert at the Moncrieff Entertainment Centre to help raise funds for the local renal unit and the Cancer Council. Photo: Mike Knott / NewsMail Mike Knott

Five more years passed before Mr Rogers took another devastating blow. He was diagnosed with terminal skin cancer last October, the side-effect of the rejection medication.

Close family friend Shanyn Limpus said Mr Rogers was warned about the risks of transplant, including organ rejection, and was closely monitored in the months following surgery.

"The doctors did some scans and found the skin cancer late last year," she said.

Mr Rogers lost his battle with cancer on Monday, just days before a charity concert to help raise awareness in his name.

Ms Limpus spoke to the NewsMail on behalf of the family as son Grant, 32, is in hospital receiving treatment for the same disease.

"In a cruel twist of fate, polycystic kidney disease is hereditary and has been passed onto Wayne's youngest son," Ms Limpus said.

"Grant was diagnosed with the same condition as his father but at a much younger age, and as a result is now experiencing kidney failure at the age of 32."

She said Grant would soon make arrangements to start life-sustaining dialysis treatment and discuss transplant options in the coming weeks.

"Grant organised this concert for his dad as he has a lot of connections to the music industry," Ms Limpus said.

"He would like to thank everyone for the support of the family through this time."

Mr Rogers' funeral service will be held on Friday afternoon and the Wayne's Wish Charity Concert will go ahead on Saturday at the Moncrieff.

 

Wayne's Wish Charity Concert   WAYNE Rogers' family and friends said despite his terminal cancer diagnosis he remained positive until the end and was incredibly thankful for the support from the Bundaberg Renal Unit.

Mr Rogers lost his fight with cancer only days before a concert planned to increase awareness about the disease.  

The Wayne's Wish Charity Concert will raise funds for both Cancer Council Queensland and the Bundaberg Renal Unit.

  There will be variety of local bands performing which includes Matthew Barker Band, Suellen Cusack and Electric Banana.  

Family friend Shanyn Limpus said the concert would now be held Mr Rogers' memory, and raise funds to help the organisations which supported his family throughout the past 10 years.  

The concert will be held at the Moncrieff Entertainment Centre on Bourbong St this Saturday.   Doors open at 1.30pm and tickets are $25 each.  

For more information search Wayne's Wish Charity Concert on Facebook or contact the Moncrieff Entertainment Centre on 4130 4100.      

 

Thank you from Cancer Council

CANCER Council Queensland has offered its condolences to the Rogers family .  

"On behalf of Cancer Council Queensland, I express our sadness at the passing of Wayne Rogers," spokeswoman Katie Clift said.  

"Driven by his own cancer experience, Wayne was dedicated to raising funds and awareness for cancer research and support.  

"Wayne's Wish Charity Concert was Wayne's way of making a difference and creating lasting memories for his loved ones. "  

She said the team was extremely thankful for Wayne's support, as one of three beneficiaries of the community event.

  "We convey our deepest condolences to Wayne's family and friends," she said.



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