An Anzac Hostel for the totally and permanently incapacitated in 1919. This picture is part of the Shell Shocked: Australia after Armistice exhibition on show at the Grafton Regional Gallery.
An Anzac Hostel for the totally and permanently incapacitated in 1919. This picture is part of the Shell Shocked: Australia after Armistice exhibition on show at the Grafton Regional Gallery. National Archives of Australia

Healing from horror of war

THE First World War officially ended on Armistice Day - November 11, 1918, but it would be decades before the countries embroiled in the bloody conflict truly recovered from it.

The healing process is at the centre of the travelling exhibition Shell Shocked: Australia after Armistice, which is on show at the Grafton Regional Gallery.

Through a collection of photographs, personal letters, service files and memorabilia from the National Archives Collection, the exhibition explores the personal impact of war on Australian men, women and children and the nation's attempt to recover from the loss or injury of almost three quarters of its soldiers serving overseas.

The exhibition also coincides with the Mapping our Anzacs project which invites members of the public to share their own family link to the First World War through their photos and mementos via a workshop to be held at the Gallery on Saturday, May 12.

For more information about the exhibition and the Mapping our Anzacs workshop, contact the gallery on 6642 3177.



Eat with the beats, bang your head and channel Fleetwood Mac

Eat with the beats, bang your head and channel Fleetwood Mac

Big weekend of live entertainment in store

Winter dry not over yet for Valley farmers

Winter dry not over yet for Valley farmers

The rain comes as welcome relief, but is it enough?

Blogger defends Serge Benhayon 'dark past' claims

premium_icon Blogger defends Serge Benhayon 'dark past' claims

Press kit suggested group used 'mind control' techniques, court told

Local Partners