GOOD CAUSE: Sally Butt from Lawrence Bluff Point Quilters and Yamba's Kerrie Huxham with some donated fabrics to make menstrual kits for humanitarian movement Days for Girls.
GOOD CAUSE: Sally Butt from Lawrence Bluff Point Quilters and Yamba's Kerrie Huxham with some donated fabrics to make menstrual kits for humanitarian movement Days for Girls. Contributed

Helping to generate dignity

THE Lawrence Bluff Point Quilters are well known for their works for charitable causes, but it was a surprise to Kerrie Huxham, from Yamba, when she was sorting through the fabric remnants for sale at the Bluff Point Quilters annual exhibition at Lawrence on Saturday 1 September.

Kerrie was looking for special fabrics for making Days for Girls menstrual kits.

When she explained to Sally Butt, what she was looking for and why, Sally offered, "Please, take whatever you need.”

Kerrie is a Rural Emergency Nurse, an entomologist and has gained a Master's Degree in Tropical Medicine and Public Health in Queensland.

Kerrie volunteers her services annually on a Townsville based medical ship providing primary health care, dentistry, optometry, education and spiritual support to remote villages in Papus New guinea. Days for Girls menstrual kits are distributed accompanied with reproductive education there are never enough.

But since learning about Days for Girls Kerrie has taken on this project with a fervour. Kerrie, who lives at Yamba, is part of a sewing group at Iluka who make the Days for Girls menstrual kits.

Rotary Iluka have chosen Days for Girls as one of their overseas projects.

Days For Girls began in 2008 when founder and CEO Celeste Mergens was working with a family foundation in Kenya when she began assisting an orphanage in the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya.

Celeste noticed girls were missing school.

She discovered that girls with their menstrual period stayed in their rooms, sitting on cardboard for several days each month, often going without food unless someone would bring it to them.

This set in motion her first intervention - disposable pads. But Celeste and her team quickly discovered a major problem - without any place to dispose of the pads, this was not a viable or sustainable solution. It was time for plan B: a washable, long-lasting pad.

Now after many changes, they have achieved a kit which is comfortable, uses little water, and lasts a long time.

The choice of fabric is important, and this is why Kerrie is always searching remnants for the right material.

The DFG kits offer girls is an effective hygiene solution, assists girls break the cycle of poverty and live lives of dignity.

If you would like to help this project with materials, washers, undies, packing or sewing skills, please call Kerrie on 0429 647 200. You can learn more about the project on www.daysforgirls.org



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