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Hit and run victim takes big steps in long recovery

ON THE MEND: Warwick beekeeper Paul Reid is walking and driving, four months after he was left for dead in a terrifying hit and run.
ON THE MEND: Warwick beekeeper Paul Reid is walking and driving, four months after he was left for dead in a terrifying hit and run. Kerri Moore

FOUR months after he was mown down and left for dead in a horrific hit and run, Warwick beekeeper Paul Reid is starting to see his old life returning.

Mr Reid was one of three people struck and seriously injured when a car clipped a parked 4WD before ploughing into the trio as they worked in the Dalmorton State Forest, near Grafton.

The driver fled the scene and still has not been located.

The shocking hit and run left Mr Reid's life hanging in the balance. His body battled to overcome a shattered pelvis, cracked ribs and serious leg injuries.

Now, Mr Reid has just completed a round of intensive rehabilitation and is back home, back behind the wheel of his car and looking forward to getting back to work. "My right leg has still got a long way to go to retain full strength and movement and my lower back is still giving me problems," he said.

Being hospitalised and injured took a large toll on Mr Reid, who until that point had enjoyed an active lifestyle.

With no recollection of the moment he was run down, Mr Reid said he was glad there were no mental scars on top of the physical ones.

"Waking up and hearing voices and people say my name, and being able to see shadowy figures but not move was very surreal," he said.

"It took a week to 10 days in the trauma ward before I started to be able to have the processes to put together the things I was being told.

"I'm fine mentally because I don't have a direct memory connection between what happened on that day, so that has been a major buffer.

"I know what the reality of what happened that day is but I haven't got any baggage from the event."

Although no one has yet been charged in relation to the incident, Mr Reid said he was hopeful the police would one day find the person responsible.

"Anyone who can run down three people and keep driving should not be on the road," he said.

With so much of his recovery complete Mr Reid said he had a special task in mind in the near future.

"One of the most important things I am going to be doing now when my back and leg are feeling comfortable, is I'm going to do a run to NSW to thank the people who helped get me where I am now," he said.

"The ambulance at Grafton, the Westpac Helicopter at Coffs Harbour and the John Hunter ICU and trauma unit all took great care of me. I'm not the only one they have been able to bring back and to be able to thank them is very important.

"I want them to know the work they've done is not only appreciated, but for them to see me up and walking after the state I was in and for them to know what they did has benefited me."

Topics:  hit and run victim recovery warwick people



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