FFA chairman Steven Lowy will reluctantly walk away from the job.
FFA chairman Steven Lowy will reluctantly walk away from the job.

50-year dynasty ends: Lowy calls time on FFA reign

WITH a 'heavy heart' FFA boss Steven Lowy has decided not to seek re-election, opting instead to remove himself from an equation he feels has become increasingly personal.

Lowy's three-year term as chairman of the FFA ends in November, but there remains the very real possibility that the FFA board could be sacked by FIFA and replaced with a normalisation committee before then.

The decision ends a 50-year involvement in the sport for the Lowy family.

The congress review working group (CRWG), tasked with resolving the game's governance issues, has submitted its recommendations to FIFA and if their proposals are not adopted at an FFA special general meeting on September 7, the world's governing body could install a normalisation committee to run the sport.

Lowy has been accused of clinging onto power during the long-running governance saga, but he says he has only ever been motivated by his love for the game.

"I do this with a heavy heart," Lowy said.

Steven Lowy withGraham Arnold as the Socceroos boss’ unveiling.
Steven Lowy withGraham Arnold as the Socceroos boss’ unveiling.

"It's not my preference, but I want to show leadership. I think I've always shown a statesmanlike approach to the role and I've always done the role for the right reasons.

"I love the game. I played it for 40 years. I've lived it as a family together with my father and brothers and I lived it in my adult life next to my father and seeing what he went through.

"I don't think there could be any greater stand from me not looking to hold onto power. I've never done this job to cling onto power, I've done it simply because I love football and I love this nation.

"I believe so much of the debate has been personal, it's been clouded, and I really want to take myself out of the equation."

Despite the ugly dispute that has marred much of Lowy's tenure since he took over from his father, Sir Frank Lowy, he is proud of what the FFA has achieved and believes he leaves the game in exciting position.

But he has warned that any disproportionate allocation of resources will cause the game to suffer in the long run.

Steven Lowy with FIFA President Gianni Infantino (R) at the World Cup.
Steven Lowy with FIFA President Gianni Infantino (R) at the World Cup.

"The game's not broken, far from it, the game is in a very exciting position," he said.

"But I did say when I took on the chairmanship that I felt the game was in a very fragile position. The foundations were built, they were built by the previous board, but they're not strong enough.

"The game is either going to prosper or fumble and I feel we're really in a position now that unless this congress review process ends up where the game is in better shape than it is today and it evolves in a proper and sustainable manner, I fear the game will struggle deeply."



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