BEST CASE SCENARIO: How Kuluin, Maroochydore, Alex Headland, Mooloolaba, down to Currimundi will look by 2100 if a global agreement is reached to drastically cut emissions.
BEST CASE SCENARIO: How Kuluin, Maroochydore, Alex Headland, Mooloolaba, down to Currimundi will look by 2100 if a global agreement is reached to drastically cut emissions. Coastal Risk Australia

Insurance won’t cover damage caused by rising seas

LARGE parts of the Sunshine Coast could be under water in a couple of decades and if you thought your property would be covered by expensive insurance premiums you would be wrong.

An astonishing new website, coastalrisk.com.au, clearly maps out current predictions rising sea-levels and how the Sunshine Coast will look in 2100 using an interactive map tool.

Mudjimba, Twin Waters and those envied multi-million dollar homes at Noosa Heads are among the many that will be under the sea.


RELATED: Rising sea levels: Mapping Sunshine Coast risk areas


But an Insurance Council of Australia spokesman said home insurance policies did not cover flooding caused by "actions of the sea".

"Actions of the sea, whether due to king tides, coastal erosion or rising sea levels are not considered to be flooding for the purposes of insurance," the spokesman said.

"93% of all new home insurance policies purchased in Australia now include cover for flooding under the standard definition, but home insurance typically does not cover actions of the sea."

Should insurers cover flooding caused by "actions of the sea"?

This poll ended on 25 April 2016.

Current Results

Yes. Flooding is flooding, it shouldn't matter what causes it.

44%

No. As long as they are clear about what they cover in their policy people have the choice of buying it or not.

24%

We should be thinking about preventing this kind of flooding, not who will pay for it once it happens.

32%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.


The standard definition of insurance, adopted in 2012, limited flooding to water that escaped from a lake, river, creek, natural watercourse, reservoir, canal or dam.

The Insurance Council spokesman said it was the role of governments to protect home-owners and businesses from threats and has urged for investment.

"The ICA believes Australian governments must urgently invest in protecting communities against the impact of extreme weather events, rather than spending billions of dollars each year on reconstruction efforts following disasters," the spokesman said.


RELATED: So, are you set to own a waterfront home by 2100?


The good news is both the Sunshine Coast Council and the State Government were actively preparing for the effects of rising sea levels. The bad news it is going to come at cost.

UDIA Sunshine Coast President Andrew Stevens said the council's new planning scheme incorporated a 0.8% rise in sea level, requiring new properties in low-lying areas to be filled at a cost of about $5000 per 600sqm block.

The State Government has provided $40 million to support local government projects aimed at addressing climate change impacts.



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