It’s time to be active and outrageous for ageing festival

ACTIVE and outrageous seniors of the Clarence Valley will get the chance to become part of a growing musical trend by learning the basics of ukulele playing as part of an aging festival that kicks off in early March.

Music teacher and ukulele enthusiast Anne Commerford will run ukulele lessons on March 8, 15, 22 and 29 as part of the Active and Outrageous Ageing Festival in the Clarence Valley.

Ms Commerford said participants could learn all the basics of ukulele playing over four weeks.

"It promises to be a lot of fun," she said.

"We will work towards a short performance at the Active and Outrageous Seniors Expos in Grafton and Yamba."

Ms Commerford said there was a growing body of scientific research suggesting that playing and/or learning to play a musical instrument could delay the onset of dementia.

"I have taught many older people who do not read music and have never picked up an instrument," she said. "They are surprised at how easy the ukulele is to learn."

Other Active and Outrageous Seniors Festival events include:

April 1: Seniors expo at South Grafton Ex-Servicemen's Club. A variety of information stalls, speakers and entertainers are booked to ensure there is something for everyone.

April 4: Seniors expo at Yamba Bowling Club. Yamba's Be Fit - For You group facilitator, Pam Coulson, will demonstrate how easy it is to participate in this program for seniors.

April 9: Fun Day in Grafton. Face painting for seniors, croquet, boules (also known as bocce or petanque) and other entertainment.



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