Rae Wilson

Bleijie gets help to stop release of sex offender Fardon

UPDATE: QUEENSLAND'S Attorney-General is already taking steps to stop repeat sex offender Robert John Fardon's imminent release from prison.

Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie requested urgent advice from the Solicitor-General just hours after Justice Peter Lyons ordered Fardon's conditional release on a strict supervision order.

Justice Lyons said Fardon, 64, remained a serious danger to the community but rescinded an indefinite jail term after hearing psychiatrists downgrading his risk during a hearing earlier this week.

He said there was more confidence Fardon would now comply with a supervision order, which he breached the last time he was released, than on previous occasions.

The release order will be formally made after parties agree on the wording of conditions.

Mr Bleijie said that meant no official release order had been made yet and Fardon "isn't going anywhere until that occurs".

"We will do everything we can to ensure Robert John Fardon is kept away from the community," Mr Bleijie said.

"I share his victims' and the community's fear and frustration and if we can appeal this decision we will. The fight is definitely not over.

"His victims are living a life sentence of their own and we owe it to them and the public to take action."

One of his victims, who spoke out the front of the Brisbane Supreme Court complex where the judgment was handed down, said something more must be done to "keep this predator off the street and keep kids and women safe".

"He's a proven psychopath, he will offend. There's no doubt in my mind," she said.

"Unfortunately, it's going to be at the cost of someone else.

"It's frightening for the community."

Fardon, who has told counsellors he was a sex abuse victim himself, has spent most of the past 23 years in jail with the most serious offences against young girls.

He was the first person in Queensland given an indefinite jail sentence, after the law was changed to keep him behind bars

Fardon, born in Murwillumbah in NSW, was released on a strict supervision order earlier this year but the Court of Appeal overturned the order after the Attorney-General appealed the decision

Justice Lyons said the psychiatrists most feared Fardon would form a relationship with a woman and then coerce her into sexual behaviours, would become exploitative and sexually demanding, and would exceed recognised boundaries because he had a strong sense of entitlement.

But he said that feared behaviour was different to the rapes he committed in the 1980s that landed him behind bars.

 

 

EARLIER: Convicted sex offender Robert John Fardon again faces release into the community under a strict supervision order.

Justice Peter Lyons handed down his judgment in Brisbane Supreme Court on Friday morning but no details have yet been released.

The judgment is expected to be released online later today.

Fardon will not be released immediately though as there are still some other matters to be nutted out.

Medical professionals told Justice Lyons, during a hearing earlier this week, that Fardon's risk of reoffending if released had reduced from high to moderate with strict supervision.

Fardon, born in Murwillumbah in NSW, has spent 23 years in jail, with his three most serious crimes relating to sex offences against two young children.

The 64-year-old was the first Queenslander given an indefinite jail sentence, after the law was changed to keep him behind bars.

He was released on a strict supervision order earlier this year but the Court of Appeal overturned the order after the Attorney-General appealed the decision.

One of his victims, who spoke out the front of court, called on the Attorney-General and the Queensland Premier to step in again and appeal the decision.

She said something more must be done to "keep this predator off the street and keep kids and women safe".

"He's a proven psychopath, he will offend. There's no doubt in my mind," she said.

"Unfortunately it's going to be at the cost of someone else.

"It's frightening for the community."

The woman, who cannot be named under Queensland law, said the repeat court cases for Fardon's freedom bids were taking their toll on his victims.

She said he had been to court four times this year and now must come back a fifth time.

"Survivors don't have a chance to move on," she said.

The Attorney-General is expected to comment on the case later today after reviewing the judgment.



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